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Biden win confirmed after protestors storm US Capitol

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WATCH LIVE: US Capital on lock down after protestors breach the buildingViewer Discretion is Advised: This is live...

Posted by KTIV News 4 on Wednesday, January 6, 2021

UPDATE (3 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has confirmed Democrat Joe Biden as the presidential election winner, hours after protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

The day after the Capitol was under siege, there were fresh questions — including about the president’s fitness to remain in office and the ability of the police to secure the Capitol complex from a mob. One Republican lawmaker publicly called for invoking the 25th Amendment to force Trump out.

Lawmakers worked through the night to tally the vote after the earlier incursion forced them into hiding. At a huge rally near the White House, the president had urged his supporters to march to Capitol Hill to protest his election defeat.

After the vote, Trump promised an “orderly transition” on Jan. 20.


PREVIOUS (10:20 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The House has voted to reject an objection to President-elect Joe Biden's win in Arizona, joining the Senate in upholding the results of the election there.

The objection failed 303-121 on Wednesday night, with only Republicans voting in support.

Earlier Wednesday, supporters of President Donald Trump breached the U.S. Capitol, forcing a lockdown of the lawmakers and staff inside. Trump has claimed widespread voter fraud to explain away his defeat to Biden, though election officials have said there wasn't any.

Now that Arizona is out of the way, Congress will reconvene as the joint session and make its way through the rest of the states that have objections.


PREVIOUS (9:15 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate has turned aside a challenge to President-elect Joe Biden's victory in Arizona, guaranteeing the result will stand.

The objection to the results in Arizona -- spearheaded by Rep. Paul Gosar and Sen. Ted Cruz -- was rejected 93-6 on Wednesday night. All votes in favor came from Republicans, but after violent protesters mobbed the Capitol earlier Wednesday a number of GOP senators who had planned to support the objection reversed course.

The Republicans raised the objection based on false claims pushed by President Donald Trump and others of issues with the vote in Arizona, which were repeatedly dismissed in Arizona's courts and by the state's election officials.


PREVIOUS (8:20 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - In an unprecedented step, Twitter and Facebook on Wednesday temporarily blocked President Donald Trump after he repeatedly posted accusations about the integrity of the election.

Twitter, which locked Trump's account for 12 hours, also threatened him with a permanent ban if he breaks the rules again. Facebook blocked Trump from being able to post for 24 hours.

The two platforms, as well as YouTube, had already removed a short video Trump posted Wednesday in which he urged supporters who stormed the U.S. Capitol to "go home" while at the same time repeating his claims about the presidential election.


PREVIOUS (6:44 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Thousands of people supportive of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol and forced lawmakers to evacuate Wednesday.

The occupiers forced lawmakers to be rushed from the building and interrupted challenges to Joe Biden's Electoral College victory. President Trump has issued a call for peace.


PREVIOUS (5:10 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - A woman who was shot inside the U.S. Capitol during the violent pro-Trump protest has died.

That's according to two officials familiar with the matter who spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak publicly.

The Metropolitan Police Department said it was taking the lead on the shooting investigation. Police did not immediately provide details about the circumstances of the shooting.

Dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump breached the security perimeter and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden's presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Hours later, police had declared the Capitol was secured.
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PREVIOUS (4:50 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Officials have declared the U.S. Capitol complex "secure" after heavily armed police moved to end a nearly four-hour violent occupation by supporters of President Donald Trump.

An announcement saying "the Capitol is secure" rang out Wednesday evening inside a secure location for officials of the House. Lawmakers applauded.

The occupation interrupted Congress' Electoral College count that will formalize President-elect Joe Biden's upcoming inauguration on Jan. 20.
Lawmakers were evacuated to secure locations around the Capitol complex and Washington, D.C. after thousands of Trump supporters breached the building and skirmished with police officers.

Lawmakers have signaled that they would resume the constitutionally mandated count as soon as it was safe to do so.


PREVIOUS (4:45 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam have issued a curfew for two inner suburbs of northern Virginia as authorities sought to gain control after rioting at the U.S. Capitol.

The curfew applies from 6 p.m. Wednesday to 6 a.m. Thursday in Arlington County and the city of Alexandria, which are across the Potomac River from the nation's capital. The curfew coincides with a similar order in the District of Columbia.

Northam said he issued the order at the request of local officials.
Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson confirmed that the city requested the curfew. He tweeted, "Let's keep our community safe in the face of the terror we have seen across the River today."

Virginia sent local and state police to the District to provide aid. Violating the curfew is a Class 1 misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail.

The curfew was imposed barely an hour before it was to take effect.


PREVIOUS (4:40 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Police are using tear gas and percussion grenades to begin clearing pro-Trump protesters from the grounds of the U.S. Capitol ahead of a curfew in Washington.

Police donned gas masks as they moved in Wednesday evening with force to clear protesters from the Capitol grounds shortly before a curfew took hold. In the moments before, there were violent clashes between the police and protesters, who tore railing for the inauguration scaffolding and threw it at the officers.

Police used tear gas and percussion grenades to break up the crowd, which began dispersing.

Dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump breached security perimeter and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote to affirm Democrat Joe Biden's presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Police said at least one person was shot inside the Capitol; their condition was not immediately known.

The district's police chief said at least 13 people were arrested, and five firearms had been recovered during the pro-Trump protests on Wednesday.


PREVIOUS (4:30 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Republican Sen. Ben Sasse is directly blaming President Donald Trump for the storming of the Capitol by huge, angry crowds of pro-Trump protesters.

The Nebraska lawmaker and frequent critic of Trump said Wednesday evening that the Capitol "was ransacked while the leader of the free world cowered behind his keyboard -- tweeting against his Vice President for fulfilling the duties of his oath to the Constitution."

Sasse says in a written statement, "Lies have consequences. This violence was the inevitable and ugly outcome of the President's addiction to constantly stoking division."

The protesters broke into the building as Congress was beginning the formal process of certifying the electoral votes that gave Democratic President-elect Joe Biden a victory over Trump in November.


PREVIOUS (5:25 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -The Washington, D.C., police chief says at least five weapons have been recovered and at least 13 people have been arrested so far in pro-Trump protests.

The mostly maskless crowd stormed the Capitol earlier Wednesday as lawmakers were meeting to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win. One person was shot; their condition is unknown.

Police Chief Robert Contee called the attack a riot.

As darkness began to set in, law enforcement officials were working their way toward the protesters, using percussion grenades to try to clear the area around the Capitol. Big clouds of tear gas were visible.

Police were in full riot gear. They moved down the West steps, clashing with demonstrators.
Mayor Muriel Bowser earlier declared a 6 p.m. curfew.


PREVIOUS (4:05 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Pro-Trump demonstrators have massed outside statehouses across the country, forcing evacuations in at least two states. In St. Paul, Minnesota, cheers rang out from demonstrators in reaction to the news that supporters of President Donald Trump had stormed the U.S. Capitol.

Hundreds of mostly unmasked people people gathered outside capitols on Wednesday with Trump flags and "Stop the Steal" signs. In Georgia and Oklahoma, some demonstrators carried guns.

New Mexico state police evacuated staff from a statehouse building that includes the governor's and secretary of state's offices as a precaution shortly after hundreds of flag-waving supporters arrived in a vehicle caravan and on horseback. A spokesperson for the governor's office says there was no indication of threats at the statehouse.


PREVIOUS (4 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The police chief of Washington, D.C., says pro-Trump protesters deployed "chemical irritants" on police in order to break into the U.S. Capitol.

Police Chief Robert Contee says officials have declared the scene a riot. One civilian was shot inside the Capitol on Wednesday. Thirteen arrests were made of people from out of the area.

Mayor Muriel Bowser says the behavior of the Trump supporters was "shameful, unpatriotic and above all is unlawful." She says, "There will be law and order and this behavior will not be tolerated."

Metropolitan police have been sent to the Capitol, and authorities were coming in from Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey to help out. The National Guard was also deployed, as were Homeland Security investigators and Secret Service.

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress' formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden's win. He held a rally earlier Wednesday and urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to "get rid of the weak Congress people" and saying, "get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength."


PREVIOUS (3:40 p.m.)
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump, in a video message, is urging supporters to "go home" but is also keeping up false attacks about the presidential election.

The video was issued more than two hours after protesters began storming the Capitol on Wednesday as lawmakers convened for an extraordinary joint session to confirm the Electoral College results and President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Trump opened his video, saying, "I know your pain. I know your hurt. But you have to go home now."

He also went on to call the supporters "very special." He also said, "we can't play into the hands of these people. We have to have peace. So go home. We love you. You're very special."

Republican lawmakers and previous administration officials had begged Trump to give a statement to his supporters to quell the violence. The statement came as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.


PREVIOUS (3:35 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - At least one explosive device has been found near the U.S. Capitol amid a violent occupation of the building by supporters of President Donald Trump.

Law enforcement officials said the device was no longer a threat Wednesday afternoon.

That's according to a U.S. official who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Thousands of supporters of the president occupied the Capitol complex as lawmakers were beginning to tally the electoral votes that will formalize President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Vice President Mike Pence has called on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than Trump, who merely called for his supporters to "remain peaceful."


PREVIOUS (3:10 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - President-elect Joe Biden has called the violent protests on the U.S. Capitol "an assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people's business."

Biden also demanded President Donald Trump to immediately make a televised address calling on his supporters to cease the violence that he described as an "unprecedented assault' as pro-Trump protestors violently occupy U.S. Capitol.

Biden's condemnation came after violent protesters breached the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday afternoon, forcing a delay in the constitutional process to affirm the president-elect's victory in the November election.

Biden addressed the violent protests as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.


PREVIOUS (3:05 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice President Mike Pence is calling on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than President Donald Trump who merely called for his supporters to "remain peaceful."

In a tweet Wednesday afternoon, Pence said, "This attack on our Capitol will not be tolerated and those involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law."

Pence, long a loyal aide to the president, defied Trump earlier Wednesday, tell him he didn't have the power to discard electoral votes that will make Democrat Joe Biden the next president on Jan. 20. Trump had publicly called on Pence to overturn the will of the voters, but Pence's constitutional role in the process was only ceremonial.


PREVIOUS (3 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Pentagon says about 1,100 D.C. National Guard members are being mobilized to help support law enforcement as violent supporters of President Donald Trump breached the U.S. Capitol.

Pentagon spokesperson Jonathan Hoffman said Wednesday afternoon that defense leaders have been in contact with the city and congressional leadership.

A defense official said all 1,100 of the D.C. Guard were being activated and sent to the city's armory. The Guard forces will be used at checkpoints and for other similar duties and could also help in the enforcement of the 6 p.m. curfew being implemented tonight in the city.

The officials said the D.C. request for National Guard was not rejected earlier in the day. Instead, according to officials, the Guard members have a very specific mission that does not include putting military in a law enforcement role at the Capitol. As a result, the Guard must be used to backfill law enforcement outside the Capitol complex, freeing up more law enforcement to respond to the Capitol.

Hoffman said the law enforcement response to the violence will be led by the Justice Department.


PREVIOUS (2:55 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The top Democrats in Congress are demanding that President Donald Trump order his supporters to leave the Capitol following a chaotic protest aimed at blocking a peaceful transfer of power.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a joint statement on Wednesday after violent protesters stormed the Capitol. They said, "We are calling on President Trump to demand that all protestors leave the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Grounds immediately."

President Trump earlier encouraged his supporters occupying the U.S. Capitol to "remain peaceful," but he did not call for them to disperse. He held a rally earlier Wednesday in which he repeated his false claims that President-elect Joe Biden had won the election through voter fraud.


PREVIOUS (2:40 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump, in a video message, is urging supporters to "go home" but is also keeping up false attacks about the presidential election.

The video was issued more than two hours after protesters began storming the Capitol on Wednesday as lawmakers convened for an extraordinary joint session to confirm the Electoral College results and President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Trump opened his video, saying, "I know your pain. I know your hurt. But you have to go home now."

He also went on to call the supporters "very special." He also said, "we can't play into the hands of these people. We have to have peace. So go home. We love you. You're very special."

Republican lawmakers and previous administration officials had begged Trump to give a statement to his supporters to quell the violence.

The statement came as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.


PREVIOUS (3:35 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- At least one explosive device has been found near the U.S. Capitol amid a violent occupation of the building by supporters of President Donald Trump.

Law enforcement officials said the device was no longer a threat Wednesday afternoon.

That's according to a U.S. official who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Thousands of supporters of the president occupied the Capitol complex as lawmakers were beginning to tally the electoral votes that will formalize President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Vice President Mike Pence has called on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than Trump, who merely called for his supporters to "remain peaceful."


PREVIOUS (3:10 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President-elect Joe Biden has called the violent protests on the U.S. Capitol "an assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people's business."

Biden also demanded President Donald Trump to immediately make a televised address calling on his supporters to cease the violence that he described as an "unprecedented assault' as pro-Trump protestors violently occupy U.S. Capitol.

Biden's condemnation came after violent protesters breached the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday afternoon, forcing a delay in the constitutional process to affirm the president-elect's victory in the November election.

Biden addressed the violent protests as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.


PREVIOUS (3:05 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Vice President Mike Pence is calling on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than President Donald Trump who merely called for his supporters to "remain peaceful."

In a tweet Wednesday afternoon, Pence said, "This attack on our Capitol will not be tolerated and those involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law."

Pence, long a loyal aide to the president, defied Trump earlier Wednesday, tell him he didn't have the power to discard electoral votes that will make Democrat Joe Biden the next president on Jan. 20. Trump had publicly called on Pence to overturn the will of the voters, but Pence's constitutional role in the process was only ceremonial.

Angry Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting the peaceful transfer of power. Trump later issued a restrained call for peace but did not ask his supporters to disperse.


PREVIOUS (3 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Pentagon says about 1,100 D.C. National Guard members are being mobilized to help support law enforcement as violent supporters of President Donald Trump breached the U.S. Capitol.

Pentagon spokesperson Jonathan Hoffman said Wednesday afternoon that defense leaders have been in contact with the city and congressional leadership.

A defense official said all 1,100 of the D.C. Guard were being activated and sent to the city's armory. The Guard forces will be used at checkpoints and for other similar duties and could also help in the enforcement of the 6 p.m. curfew being implemented tonight in the city.

The officials said the D.C. request for National Guard was not rejected earlier in the day. Instead, according to officials, the Guard members have a very specific mission that does not include putting military in a law enforcement role at the Capitol. As a result, the Guard must be used to backfill law enforcement outside the Capitol complex, freeing up more law enforcement to respond to the Capitol.

Hoffman said the law enforcement response to the violence will be led by the Justice Department.


PREVIOUS (2:55 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The top Democrats in Congress are demanding that President Donald Trump order his supporters to leave the Capitol following a chaotic protest aimed at blocking a peaceful transfer of power.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a joint statement on Wednesday after violent protesters stormed the Capitol. They said, "We are calling on President Trump to demand that all protestors leave the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Grounds immediately."

Trump earlier encouraged his supporters occupying the U.S. Capitol to "remain peaceful," but he did not call for them to disperse. He held a rally earlier Wednesday in which he repeated his false claims that President-elect Joe Biden had won the election through voter fraud.

He urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to "get rid of the weak Congress people" and saying, "get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength."


PREVIOUS (2:50 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The White House says National Guard troops along with other federal protective services are en route to the Capitol to help end an violent occupation by President Donald Trump's supporters who are seeking to prevent the certification of the 2020 presidential election.

Press secretary Kayleigh McEnany tweeted that "At President @realDonaldTrump's direction, the National Guard is on the way along with other federal protective services." She added, "We reiterate President Trump's call against violence and to remain peaceful."

Republican lawmakers have publicly called for Trump to more vocally condemn the violence and to call to an end to the occupation, which halted a joint session of Congress where lawmakers were beginning to count electoral votes.

Trump lost the November election to Democrat Joe Biden. He has refused to concede and has worked over the last two months to convince his supporters that widespread voter fraud prevented his own victory.


PREVIOUS (2:40 p.m.)

Republican lawmakers are increasingly calling on President Donald Trump to act to deescalate the violent protests at the U.S. Capitol by his supporters angry about his election loss.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said he spoke with the president earlier Wednesday and told him to make a statement to "make sure that we can calm individuals down."

Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio tweeted that "it is crucial you help restore order by sending resources to assist the police and ask those doing this to stand down."

Republican Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey told The Associated Press that while he sympathizes with the protesters' position, they shouldn't get violent, and it would be "nice" if Trump called on them to "protest in a peaceful way in an appropriate spot, where you belong, where you should be."

Many Republicans had backed Trump's false claims of widespread voter fraud to explain away his defeat to President-elect Joe Biden.
Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher, of Wisconsin, posted a video message urging Trump to "call it off."

"This is Banana Republic crap that we're watching right now," said Gallagher, who had spoken out against objections from fellow Republicans to certifying President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College vote.


PREVIOUS (2:35 p.m.)

The Department of Homeland Security is sending additional federal agents to the U.S. Capitol to help quell violence from supporters of President Donald Trump who are protesting Congress' formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden's win.

A spokesperson told The Associated Press on Wednesday that officers from the Federal Protective Service and U.S. Secret Service agents are being sent to the scene.

He says they were requested to assist by U.S. Capitol Police.

Dozens of Trump supporters breached security perimeters and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden's presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.


PREVIOUS (2:35 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - One person has been shot at the U.S. Capitol as dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the building and violently clashed with police.

That's according to a person familiar with the matter who spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday on condition of anonymity amid a chaotic situation.

The exact circumstances surrounding the shooting were unclear. The person said the victim had been taken to a hospital. Their condition was not known.

The shooting came as dozens of Trump supporters breached security perimeters and entered the U.S. Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden's presidential win. Trump has riled up his supporters by falsely claiming widespread voter fraud to explain his loss.


PREVIOUS (2 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The U.S. Capitol locked down Wednesday with lawmakers inside as violent clashes broke out between supporters of President Donald Trump police.

Dozens of people breached security perimeters at the Capitol and lawmakers inside the House chamber were told to put on gas masks as tear gas was fired in the Rotunda. Lawmakers had been meeting to affirm Joe Biden's victory.

The skirmishes occurred outside the building, in the very spot president-elect Biden will be inaugurated in just two weeks. Protesters tore down metal barricades at the bottom of the Capitol's steps and were met by officers in riot gear.

Some tried to push past the officers who held shields and officers could be seen firing pepper spray into the crowd to keep them back.

PREVIOUS (1:50 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The mayor of Washington, D.C., has ordered a curfew in the nation's capital beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday after protestors seeking to overturn the election results stormed the U.S. Capitol building.

Mayor Muriel Bowser issued the order as protestors supporting President Donald Trump breached the Capitol, where lawmakers were meeting to formally count the electors that will make Joe Biden president on Jan. 20.

The order extends through 6 a.m. Thursday.

The skirmishes came shortly after Trump addressed thousands of his supporters.


PREVIOUS (1:30 p.m.)

WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. Capitol locked down Wednesday with lawmakers inside as violent clashes broke out between supporters of President Donald Trump and police.

An announcement was played inside the Capitol as lawmakers were meeting and expected to vote to affirm Joe Biden's victory. The skirmishes occurred outside the building, in the very spot president-elect Biden will be inaugurated in just two weeks.

Protesters tore down metal barricades at the bottom of the Capitol's steps and were met by officers in riot gear. Some tried to push past the officers who held shields and officers could be seen firing pepper spray into the crowd to keep them back.

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